1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby mustang1989 » Tue Jul 07, 2020 4:07 am

Have you given thought to mixing white with say.....a clear? 1.) You're not going to get any spitting or gritty appearance and 2.) with enough layers I feel like you'll get the results you're looking for. It's a more gradual painting process and you get to dodge that spitting and all that's associated with white paints. Just a thought. :hmm:
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby jkim » Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:51 am

I'll give it a try!
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby jkim » Wed Jul 15, 2020 10:58 am

With the Shiden Kai in wait mode as the HGW seatbelts are en route from the Czech Republic, I finally pushed myself to put the white wash finish on the G-14. I decided to apply chipping fluid (MIG Heavy Chipping) to all of the upper surfaces to try and create wear on the white and that was a mistake. For some reason the fluid decided to pool into little balls as if I had waxed parts of the 74/75 finish. I tried dispersing it with water and MIG Scratches Effect fluid but I couldn't get it to level out. Hairspray and the various chipping fluids tends to evaporate without leaving a physical trace but I now knew that the treated areas were not completely covered. So after the chipping fluid dried, I pressed on with the white.
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As feared, the chipping didn't work out very well. Because the white coat is in blotches and not uniform, the chipping aggregated in the dark areas where the white paint is the thinnest. And so I started to develop a pattern of chipping that followed the edges of the blotches... not a good look. So... avoiding the dark areas and concentrating on just the wing roots, I did as much chipping as I could and then started repairing the other areas. After the originally chipped areas were repaired, I tested out applying chips with a sponge and got acceptable results. So that's the direction I'm heading in right now.

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Not what I had envisioned when starting this project but modeling is often an exercise in adaptation. The chipping will be developed slowly so I'm not worried about the haphazard and incomplete look of it now.
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby speedgraflex » Wed Jul 15, 2020 1:19 pm

You are an extraordinary painter facing one of the great challenges of weathering. You have both my admiration and support. The color depth and overspray are very realistic!

I guess I want to helpfully add you might try using masking tape to remove the paint as well. You can vary the stickiness by applying the tape to a clean cotton shirt beforehand; each time you stick the tape down it becomes less tacky. For what you are doing you might want to try a light pressure with blue tape, for larger uneven wear.
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby jkim » Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:57 pm

Thanks for checking in Bruce.

Tape only works if the the top layer of paint is on an unstable foundation. Which is something that most modelers try to avoid. However, the chipping fluid purposefully adds instability to that top layer. Dissolving that fluid layer with water dislodges the top paint layer into fragments and the result is (hopefully) realistic paint chipping. In my case, the chipping fluid beaded up on the base surface and created little dots of unstable white paint. Which can be lifted off by adhesive tape but it doesn't look good. The dried chipping fluid is also elastic and will pull off paint in bigger than desirable chunks. So I'm going over the model with micromesh, trying to create small areas of wear and encountering pockets of the chipping fluid, which is pulling the paint off in big chunks. These areas are being addressed by tape pulling/micromesh to remove as much of the unstable chipping fluid layer as possible even down to the plastic in certain areas. These areas will be repaired with RLM 74/75/white. It's a not a great situation but I dug my own grave on this one.
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby Floki » Wed Jul 15, 2020 7:37 pm

I'm sorry to hear your troubles with the chipping fluid. Forgive me if you mentioned it already but did you put down a gloss coat before the chipping fluid? I could see that causing it to bead up but not on a flat surface.
March as one, Don't look back
Odin's sons... Attack!
Unleash hell! Do not repent! Warfare grants us no lament
Let your weapons slash and tear This is no place for fear
Hold the lines! Move as one! In unity our victory's won
Our shields will form a mighty wall
United we shall never fall
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby jkim » Thu Jul 16, 2020 1:54 pm

I didn't put a gloss coat over the RLM 74/75 but the AK Real Colors are semi-gloss. Typically, chipping fluid is applied over metallic paints which tend to be on the smoother side too so I didn't really think the 74/75 would present a problem. The areas where I burnished the cross markings down with Micromesh exhibited the most beading so I think the smooth finish and not anything chemical was responsible.

Here is an example of some of issues I'm dealing with. If the effects were on a smaller scale, I'd be able to utilize them but the areas of white paint that were lifting were too big.
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These areas were resprayed with RLM 75 and the white overspray was re-established over that.
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Concurrent with the repairs, I've been trying to push ahead and have painted the the yellow areas under the nose and the yellow ID band around the rear fuselage.
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No masking problems for the yellow areas but the black chevrons revealed some new repair areas.
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby mustang1989 » Fri Jul 17, 2020 8:11 am

I really hate it when a build tries to kick my a$$ ESPECIALLY in the painting phase. For modelers like us that put ALOT of prep work into our paint whether it be aircraft or auto modeling alot of modeling hinges on the proper paint / finish outcomes and this can be extremely frustrating when things go wrong. Keep hangin' with 'er John. I'm looking forward to the recovery efforts and successes. :shoutout:
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby jkim » Fri Jul 17, 2020 11:35 am

It's frustrating but self-inflicted. I knew I was headed for trouble when the chipping fluid started beading up. I should've wiped it off right then and there but decided to press on. I've encountered this before so I'm not too worried about it. It's just a pain in the butt to see perfectly masked markings get flaked off bit by bit.
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Re: 1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-14 Hartmann

Postby mustang1989 » Fri Jul 17, 2020 11:51 am

jkim wrote: It's just a pain in the butt to see perfectly masked markings get flaked off bit by bit.
That's exactly my point. It'll bring a grown man to tears. :sad:
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